Heavy Hopea

Overview

Heavy Hopea is found growing through out Southeast Asia and Papua New Guinea. Trees are reported to grow upwards of 45m in height, with trunks reaching 120cm in diameter or more. Timber is commonly used in New Zealand for decking, flooring and outdoor furniture.

Heavy Hopea is commonly used in boat building and marine construction, domestic and commercial flooring, decking, heavy construction, joinery, mine timbers, wharf construction, building and construction, handles and sporting goods.

Botanical Name: Hopea iriana spp.
Standard Trade Names: Heavy Hopea.
Giam.
Other Names: Gagil, giam (Sabah) merawan (Malaya) gisok-gisok, kaliot, magasusu, manggachapui, narek (Philippines) sangal, tjengal, balau (Indonesia) lao-two, mai tajien (Thailand) emang besi (Borneo).
Origin of Product: Papua New Guinea.
Grade:
Availability: Available ex-stock in kiln dried sizes 75 x 40 100 x 40 and 150 x 40mm.
Species information for this product:
  • The heartwood is dark brown in colour initially. Exposure tends to darken the colour to an even deeper brown. Sapwood is light brown initially, indistinct from the heartwood.

  • The grain has a fine to medium texture and is typically interlocked. Resin canals produce white streaks on all surfaces. The wood has little or no figure, back sawn timber may exhibit a faint silver figure.

  • Heavy Hopea seasons well and is dimensionally stable. The timber is generally easy to work with and produces a clean smooth finish. Responds well to hand tools and machining.

Names
Family: Dipterocarpaceae.
Species: Hopea iriana spp.

Properties

Properties
Density: 870-960 Kg/m3 @ 12% m.c
Durability: Class 2: Durable.
Colour: The sapwood is light brown and is initially indistinct from the heartwood. It becomes clearly demarcated after the heartwood darkens following exposure. The heartwood is brown to dark brown in colour initially. Exposure darkens the colour to an even deeper brown.
Texture: The texture is fine to medium, and even.
Grain: The grain is typically interlocked. Resin canals produce white streaks on all surfaces.
Figure: The wood is reported to be usually devoid of figure, but back sawn timber may exhibit a faint silver figure.
Permeability: Class 4: Highly resistant; heartwood is untreatable and sapwood is comparatively narrow.
Workability
General: The timber is easy to work with. Smooth surfaces can be readily obtained providing that cutting edges are kept sharp.
Sawing: The timber is reported to be fairly difficult to saw because saw-teeth become gummed-up after a period of time.
Planing: The timber planes to yield a smooth surface.
Blunting: Moderate.
Boring: The timber is generally easy to work. It produces smooth, clean surfaces.
Turning: The timber is generally easy to work. It turns to produce smooth, clean surfaces.
Nailing: Requires pre-boring first.
Gluing: The timber glues satisfactorily.
Finishing: Excellent, will sand to a very fine finish and take a good polish.

Mechanical

Mechanical Properties
Strength: SD1.
Structural Grade: F34(select grade).
Hardness (Janka): 10kN (seasoned), 9.2kN (unseasoned).
Max. Crushing Strength: 94MPa (seasoned), 70Mpa (unseasoned).
Modulus of Elasticity: 24GPa (seasoned), 22GPa (unseasoned).
Modulus of Rupture: 169MPa (seasoned), 119MPa (unseasoned).
Seasoning
General: Seasoned wood is reported to be dimensionally stable, and exhibits only small movement in use.
Movement: Low.
Shrinkage: Low.